May 3, 2009

Will readers lead a story astray?

I post my work in progress stories in serial format on my website www.steamydarcy.com and readers follow the stories and make comments every chapter.

I find I strive on these comments to the point I take into their questions and try to answer them in the stories, thus changing my planned plots from time to time. For example with the latest Pride and Prejudice and Angels story (called Really Angelic), readers have so many questions about Himins (the heaven I created in this story), how it works, how do the gods function and react etc, I find I have a lot to answer for.

Do you think this is good to a story or will it only lead it astray?

9 comments:

  1. Hard to say, but I'm interested in seeing what you do with it.

    Lynnette Labelle
    http://lynnettelabelle.blogspot.com

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  2. Stopping in to see how it's going - so far, so good. ;)

    Dani
    http://blogbooktours.blogspot.com

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  3. Interesting dilemma. Here's what I plan for my non-fiction book... write it in full, and then publish one section at a time on my blog, serialized.

    But for my fiction novel, I was planning what you're doing - and your question will make me think hard before going ahead!

    All success
    Dr.Mani

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've been told, by MANY expert-type people, to listen to comments carefully. If more than three people are saying the same thing, you should take a look at changing your manuscript. In the end, tho, they stressed that you write the book YOU want to write.

    If not, then thank them for their opinion and move on. I guess if there are more than three people clamoring for info on the Himins, then you might want to toss them some bones.

    Brief story of my own experience: I teamed up with one other writer to read each other's stuff and critique. She loves the romance genre. Guess what I had written by the time I was finished? A romance. Here's the thing - I don't read romance and didn't want to write one. That manuscript lies, cold and alone, in a folder on my backup drive. Live and learn.

    Gayle
    http://gaylecarline.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Interesting idea. I guess I'd be a bit concerned about being plagiarized and/or ripped off doing that, but it does have its upside - getting feedback and ideas as you go along.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gayle's advice is very solid - if one person says it, several are thinking it. So if you hear a thing more than once, it's worth paying attention to.

    However, I'd be a little careful in how much you let readers sway a work in progress. It might work out great, but it could end up pulling you in too many directions.

    I'd say go for it, but be cautious and always remember it's your story in the end.

    Elle Parker
    http://elleparkerbooks.blogspot.com/

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  7. I'm not familiar with this approach, but it is intriguing. I like the red background- sexy.
    Lose the "s" on "ansers" in your first graph.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks, I amended the "s". Yes, some other writers did "borrow" some of my plots and characters from time to time. We are pretty friendly community so I don't mind. And the 3 persons rule is very good. I will bear that in mind.

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I'm the author of The Spinster's Vow, My Darcy Vibrates, Every Savage Can Reproduce, Chemical Fusion, My Darcy Mutates, Really Angelic, Bargain with the Devil, In Quest of Theta Magic and Fire and Cross. My novels have been ranked in the top 50 best-selling romances on Amazon USA or Canada. I write sexy romance in modern, historical, paranormal and science fiction genres. I love food, Pride and Prejudice, travel and tennis. With a Masters degree in Arts, I work in advertising and live in beautiful Sydney. Sounds too tame? You can read my wild stories at steamydarcy.com

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